eye hydration products

 

Stockists

Salons/Therapists

About Eye Eco Inc

Terms & Conditions

Links

 

 

View our other products

 

 

 


Dry Eyes:


About Dry Eyes

One of the most common causes of eye dryness is the normal aging process. Dry eye symptoms also can be triggered by environmental factors including low humidity environments (such as airplanes, deserts, high altitudes, and windy climates), indoor heating and air conditioning, and exposure to cigarette smoke. Poor blinking habits coupled with prolonged computer use or reading can result in pain and irritation in eyes.
In addition, certain diseases and medications can lead to severe dry eye. Over 10 million Americans suffer from Dry Eye Syndrome, a chronic condition that can impact the way they live and sleep. According to Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation, about 4 million Americans suffer from Sjogren’s syndrome, a chronic, autoimmune disease characterized by dry eyes, dry mouth and arthritis. Many other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, scleroderma and thyroid disease can also cause severe dry eye. And many medications inhibit tear production including antihistamines, antidepressants, oral contraceptives and some heart medications.

People who wear contact lenses have an increased risk of developing Dry Eye Syndrome, as contact lenses absorb the tear film and increase the evaporation of tears. There is no cure for dry eye. If left unattended, dry eye can lead to scarring of the cornea and even vision loss. Your eye doctor can recommend treatments to relieve your symptoms.

back to top


Dry Eyes: Symptoms

It is important to visit your eye doctor if you experience dry eye symptoms which include:

Itching
Burning
Irritation
Redness
Blurred vision that improves with blinking
Excessive tearing
Increased discomfort after periods of reading, watching TV, or using a computer
When visiting your doctor, be specific about the type of discomfort you experienced or are experiencing, the time of day you experience them, and whether they are aggravated by certain activities. Your doctor can help you determine the causes and the severity of dry eye symptoms, as well as recommend the best treatments for you.

back to top

Natural Tears Are a Beautiful Thing

Dry eye is a result of a reduction in the quality or quantity of natural tears. Insufficient tear production can lead to irritation, pain, and scarring of the cornea (the front covering of your eye).

Tears are essential to the health of our eyes. Tears moisturize, lubricate, nourish and clean the eye. The moisture prevents the cornea from drying, while the lubrication makes blinking smooth and comfortable. Tears also provide nourishment to the eye by supplying oxygen and removing carbon dioxide. Tears wash away foreign particles and help protect the eye from infection. Without adequate tears, the cornea can become damaged, which can lead to pain, blurred vision, and even blindness.

Tears are comprised of 3 components, oil, mucus (also called mucin) and watery tears. The innermost layer of tears is the mucus layer which coats the surface of the cornea and allows the tear film to adhere to the eye. The middle layer is the watery tears which provide moisture and supply oxygen and other nutrients to the cornea. The outer layer is composed of oil that seals the tear film and slows the evaporation of tears from the surface of the eye.

Tears are formed in several glands around the eye. The watery tears are produced in the lacrimal gland, while several smaller glands produce the oil and mucus layers. With each blink, the eyelids sweep tears across the eye. Excess tears flow into drainage ducts.

back to top

Diagram of the Eye

back to top

Evaporation, Humidity and Lipid Layer

Unlike other treatments, tranquileyes eye hydrating therapy is non-invasive, preserves natural tears, and promotes eye health. How? In a word, humidity.

The oily lipid layer on the outside of the tear film acts to preserve natural tears and spread them evenly across the eye, keeping them well-moistened.
As we age, our bodies produce less oils and therefore the oily lipid layer starts to thin.
Thinning of the lipid layer makes it harder on the eyes to hold tears and protect from evaporation.
The evaporation rate of natural tears in a dry eye can be four times as high as a normal eye."(1)
Evaporation rate of natural tears decreases when relative humidity increases."(2)
Significant changes occur in tear film lipid layer thickness following alterations in humidity of the periocular environment. Increased humidity results in a thickening of the lipid layer and a concurrent relief of dry eye symptoms both during period of exposures and hours after. "(3)
If evaporation can be controlled and returned to normal levels in patients with low tear flow, the eye might be able to maintain healthier tear osmolarity despite the low flow
tranquileyes provides immediate and long lasting relief from dry, irritated eyes. It restores moisture by increasing humidity around the eyes which prevents the evaporation of natural tears. The increased humidity also improves eye health by the thickening the lipid layer and restoring the eye’s defense against evaporation.

1. “Ocular Evaporation in Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Dry Eye”
William Mathers, MD - Ophthalmology Volume 100, Number 3, March 1995

2. “Effect of Periocular Humidity on the Tear Film Lipid Layer” Donald R. Korb, O.D., Jack V. Greiner, MD, Ph.D, Thomas Glonk, Ph.D, Roya Esbah, O.D., Victor M. Finnemore, O.D., and Amy C. Whalen, B.A. , Cornea Vol. 15. No. 2 1996

3. “Tear Flow and Evaporation in Patients with and without Dry Eye” William D. Mathers, MD, Thomas E. Daley, MS, Ophthalmology Volume 103, Number 4, April 1996.

back to top

Dry Eye Causes

Dry eye is caused by multiple factors. Some of the factors that cause and contribute to dry eyes include:

Natural Aging
Excessive contact lens use
LASIK Surgery
Infrequent or incomplete blinking associated with prolonged computer use
Low humidity environments such airplanes, dry, windy conditions, hot or cold climates, indoor heating or A/C
Irritants such as smoke or dust
Allergies
Certain diseases like Sjogren’s syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus
Bletharitis (inflammation of the eyelids)
Hormonal changes experienced during pregnancy and post menopause
Medications such as antihistamines, antidepressants, oral contraceptives and some heart medications
The most common cause of severe dry eye is the normal aging process. Over time, your body produces less oil – 60% less at age 65 than at age 18. With less oil to seal the watery layer, the tear film evaporates much faster, leaving eyes feeling dry, gritty, and irritated. According to some estimates, as many as 75% of people over age 65 will experience severe dry eye.

People who wear contact lenses have an increased risk of developing Dry Eye Syndrome, as contact lenses absorb the tear film and increase the evaporation of tears. Dry eye symptoms also can be triggered by environmental factors including low humidity environments (such as airplanes, deserts, high altitudes, and windy climates), indoor heating and air conditioning, and exposure to cigarette smoke. Poor blinking habits coupled with prolonged computer use or reading can result in pain and irritation in eyes.

In addition, certain diseases and medications can lead to severe dry eye. According to Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation, about 4 million Americans suffer from Sjogren’s syndrome, a chronic, autoimmune disease characterized by dry eyes, dry mouth and arthritis. Many other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, scleroderma and thyroid disease can also cause severe dry eye. And many medications inhibit tear production including antihistamines, antidepressants, oral contraceptives and some heart medications.

There is no cure for dry eye. If left unattended, dry eye can lead to scarring of the cornea and even vision loss.

back to top

Dry Eyes: Spectrum

back to top

Dry Eyes: Resources

For more information on dry eyes and using tranquileyes along with other dry
eye products for relief, we highly recommend the new book by Dr. Robert
Latkany: "The Dry Eye Remedy".

For more information on Dry Eyes visit:

American Academy of Ophthalmology (www.aao.org)
National Eye Institute (www.nei.nih.gov)
Schepens Eye Research Institute (www.eri.harvard.edu)
Sjogren's Syndrome Foundation (www.sjogrens.org)
The Boston Foundation for Sight (www.bostonsight.org)
The Dry Eye Zone (www.dryeyezone.com)
American Optometric Association (www.aoanet.org)
American Society of Ocular Trauma (www.asotonline.org)

back to top

 

 

Wholesale Eyecare Ltd Tel: 01442 818098 (messaging service)

All content copyright © Wholesale Eyecare Ltd and Eye Eco Inc 2008 - 2016. Registered in England and Wales at The Coach House HP1 1LF. No. 5985875
Website Design by Boxmoor Direct